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Jeanne Pelletier and Clementine Longworth Interviewed by Maria Campbell
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In 2004, the Gabriel Dumont Institute brought together Metis Elders from across Saskatchewan to hear their stories and learn about their past. Maria Campbell interviewed Jeanne Pelletier and Clementine Longworth. They share stories about educational experiences, transportation, the Michif language, living on the Road Allowance, employment, hunting, fishing, food, celebrations such as Christmas and New Year's, dancing, fiddling, clothing, medicine, midwifery, the 1885 Resistance, Louis Riel, jigging, square dancing, and more! Visit here at Metis Museum for more resources on Métis history and culture!

EarthSayers Maria Campbell; Clementine Longworth; Jeanne Pelletier
Date unknown Format Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Wisdom Keepers More Details
Grandmother's Little Butterfly
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The passing on of indigenous knowledge and culture to a young girl by her mother. 

EarthSayers Emmary Elizondo; Tracey Moore; Teranne SpottedBear
Date unknown Format Documentary
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Wisdom Keepers More Details
An Open Conversation with Indigenous Peoples of Chile
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Streamed live on Apr 21, 2018
Donate to the indigenous people of Chile! 100% of your donation goes to the people shown in this video. Use the donate button at http://www.GoldenDrum.org
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Wisdom Keepers More Details
We Have to Keep Fighting: Standing Rock
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Water Protectors Vow Continued Resistance to DAPL as Main Camp Is Evicted

Reported on by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now.

Published on Feb 23, 2017

In North Dakota, the main resistance camp set up by Lakota water protectors fighting the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline has been largely vacated after protesters were ordered to leave the camp on Wednesday. Police arrested around 10 people. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the North Dakota governor had imposed a noon eviction deadline for the hundreds of water protectors still living at the resistance camp. Prayers ceremonies were held on Wednesday, and part of the camp was set on fire before the eviction began. Water protectors say the resistance camp sits on unceded Sioux territory under the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie and that they have a right to remain on their ancestral land. A couple dozen people remain at the camp. The ongoing encampments in North Dakota were the largest gathering of Native Americans in decades. At its peak, more than 10,000 people were at the resistance camp. Earlier this month, construction crews resumed work on the final section of the pipeline, after the Trump administration granted an easement to allow Energy Transfer Partners to drill beneath the Missouri River. We go to Standing Rock to speak with LaDonna Brave Bull Allard and Linda Black Elk.
EarthSayers Linda Black Elk; LaDonna Brave Bull Allard
Date unknown Format News
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
Peace by Grace Eagle Reed
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As part of the InterFaith Call to Inclusion, we interviewed Grace Eagle Reed in Portland, Oregon. Grace was born into Tsa La Gi culture and was adopted by Lakota Grace Spotted Eagle and taught traditional ways. Produced and videotaped by Ruth Ann Barrett and Barry Heidt of EarthSayers.tv, Voices of Sustainability, November, 2016 in wake of the 2016 Election.

EarthSayer Grace Eagle Reed
Date unknown Format Series
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Interfaith Voices: Call to Inclusion More Details
Dave Courchene sends a message to Peru
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Elder Dave Courchene

Known to many as Nii Gaani Aki Inini (Leading Earth Man), Dave Courchene has touched many lives through his teachings. Choosing to leave a successful career, he has devoted himself to learning the knowledge and traditions of Indigenous People. A respected Elder, his work has been seen around the world. Serving as a member of the

Wisdom Keepers of the United Nations since 1992, he has acted in an advisory capacity to the UN in areas of spirituality and sustainable environmental approaches. In his efforts to bring message of peace and hope to the world, he founded Turtle Lodge in 2002. The lodge has since earned an international reputation as a place of learning, healing and sharing for all people. In efforts to continue carrying the message of peace across the world, he has most recently shared the stage with the Dalai Lama.

EarthSayer Dave Courchene
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Elder Dave Courchene More Details
Learning from Indigenous Peoples & Ethnic Diversity by Randy Woodley
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Randy Woodley | Learning from Indigenous Peoples & Ethnic Diversity | The GlobalChurch Project

Published on Jan 16, 2016
Randy Woodley & Graham Hill discuss embracing ethnic diversity & learning from indigenous communities. On "The GlobalChurch Project". Shortened version of interview. Full 35-minute version available here

Randy Woodley is a descendent of the United Keetoowah Band of Cherokee Indians. He and his wife Edith lead a local Native American gathering at their home. They’ve developed a holistic model of service among Native Americans, out of which grew a 50 acre sustainable farm and Christian community. In this community, the Woodleys taught sustainability, eco-justice, microeconomics, leadership, and mission. In 2008 they gave up their farm and were forced to disband the community due to violence from local White Supremacists.

Randy Woodley is a founding member of the North American Institute for Indigenous Theological Studies. He’s passionate about emerging faith expressions, diversity, eco-justice, reconciliation, mission, and indigenous peoples.

Graham Hill is the Founder and Director of The GlobalChurch Project, and Vice Principal of Morling Theological College, Sydney, Australia.

The Global Church Project films Christian leaders and churches from Africa and Asia and Latin America. We also film in the Caribbean, Eastern Europe, First Nations, Indigenous communities, the Middle East, and Oceania, and in diaspora and immigrant communities. Today, these non-Western cultures are the Majority World. The GlobalChurch Project presents resources to support these films. Small group resources. Curriculum for college classes. Books. Training videos. A blog. Coaching. Consultancy. College and short courses
EarthSayer Randy Woodley
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Wisdom Keepers More Details
Incorporating Indigenous Wisdom into Sustainability Education
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Global Center for Indigenous Leadership and Lifeways President Ilarion Larry Merculieff (Aleut) talks about his life, culture and knowledge as an indigenous leader. At the AASHE 2015 Conference and Expo he shared his perspective and vision for transforming sustainability education. January 5, 2016

EarthSayer Ilarion Merculieff
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Ilarion Merculieff More Details
Robin Kimmerer
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Published on Mar 18, 2014

Dr. Kimmerer is a mother, scientist, writer and Distinguished Teaching Professor of Environmental Biology at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry in Syracuse, New York and the founding Director of the Center for Native Peoples and the Environment whose mission is to create programs which draw on the wisdom of both indigenous and scientific knowledge for our shared goals of sustainability.
EarthSayer Robin Kimmerer, Ph.D.
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Robin Kimmerer, Ph.D. More Details
Mishkos Kenomagwen: The Teachings of Grass by Dr. Robin Kimmerer -
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Published on Nov 5, 2014

Indigenous peoples worldwide honor plants, not only as our sustainers, but as our oldest teachers who share teachings of generosity, creativity, sustainability and joy. By their living examples, plants spur our imaginations of how we might live. By braiding indigenous
Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) with modern tools of botanical science, Robin Kimmerer, professor of Environmental Science and Forestry, of Potawatomi ancestry, explores the question:If plants are our teachers, what are their lessons, and how might we become better students?
Since 1990, Bioneers has acted as a fertile hub of social and scientific innovators with practical and visionary solutions for the world's most pressing environmental and social challenges.

EarthSayer Robin Kimmerer, Ph.D.
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Robin Kimmerer, Ph.D. More Details
 

Displaying 10 videos of 97 matching videos

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