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End Amazon Crude!
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Published on Sep 28, 2016

Destroying the Rainforest, devastating the climate, deadly for indigenous peoples. Join the movement athttp://amazonwatch.org/endamazoncrude.

When most people think of where we get our oil, they primarily think of the Middle East. The tar sands of northern Canada or domestic fracking also come to mind. But drilling for oil in the Amazon? Not likely. Surprisingly oil extraction in the Amazon is rampant, and expanding. And it’s the worst possible place to be drilling. But who’s consuming the oil produced there? We are. Amazon crude is coming to California and the rest of the United States in record levels.

Amazonian peoples, many of whom consider oil to be the blood of Mother Earth, have long called on governments and corporations to keep it in the ground. Now scientists are catching up with their calls, stating that we need to keep 80% of fossil fuels in the ground in order to have a good chance of averting catastrophic climate change. As our planet’s most important carbon sink, the home to over 400 distinct indigenous peoples, and the world’s most biodiverse rainforest, it is urgent that we keep the oil in the ground in the Amazon. 

Amazon Watch is committed to supporting and amplifying the calls and proposals of our indigenous allies from the Amazon by ensuring that global governments and corporations respect their rights and territories. Based on the findings in our report FROM WELL TO WHEEL THE SOCIAL, ENVIRONMENTAL, AND CLIMATE COSTS OF AMAZON CRUDE, we call upon companies, universities, and governments to heed their call and change their vehicle fleets to Amazon-free fuel sources. By keeping the oil in the ground in the Amazon, we can contribute to the protection of the Amazon rainforest, indigenous peoples territories, and our global climate.
Date unknown Format Cartoon and Animation
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Clean Trade More Details
Dave Courchene sends a message to Peru
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Elder Dave Courchene

Known to many as Nii Gaani Aki Inini (Leading Earth Man), Dave Courchene has touched many lives through his teachings. Choosing to leave a successful career, he has devoted himself to learning the knowledge and traditions of Indigenous People. A respected Elder, his work has been seen around the world. Serving as a member of the

Wisdom Keepers of the United Nations since 1992, he has acted in an advisory capacity to the UN in areas of spirituality and sustainable environmental approaches. In his efforts to bring message of peace and hope to the world, he founded Turtle Lodge in 2002. The lodge has since earned an international reputation as a place of learning, healing and sharing for all people. In efforts to continue carrying the message of peace across the world, he has most recently shared the stage with the Dalai Lama.

EarthSayer Dave Courchene
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Elder Dave Courchene More Details
NASA Sees Temperatures Rise, Sea Ice Shrink - Climate Trends 2016
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Published on Jul 19, 2016

Two key climate change indicators have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data. Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally in the modern temperature record, which dates to 1880. Meanwhile, five of the first six months set records for the smallest monthly Arctic sea ice extent since consistent satellite records began in 1979. NASA researchers are in the field this summer, collecting data to better understand our changing climate.

Date unknown Format Visualization
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Earth's Long-Term Warming Trend, 1880-2015
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Published on Jan 20, 2016

This visualization illustrates Earth’s long-term warming trend, showing temperature changes from 1880 to 2015 as a rolling five-year average. Orange colors represent temperatures that are warmer than the 1951-80 baseline average, and blues represent temperatures cooler than the baseline.

Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Scientific Visualization Studio

This video is public domain and may be downloaded here

Date unknown Format Visualization
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Arctic Youth Witness to Climate Change with Esau Sinnok
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Published on Jun 3, 2016

Meet Esau Sinnok, an emerging leader in the climate movement. Esau hails from the village of Shishmaref, in Northwest Alaska, where the centuries-old way of life is changing. Essential ice is being lost, but he is refusing to stand by while his home melts away. Join Esau in the fight to keep dirty fuels in the ground!  



Also watch NASA's video, The Greening of Arctic here on EarthSayers.tv, Voices of Sustainability.

EarthSayer Esau Sinnok
Date unknown Format Teaching
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Our Youth Speak Up More Details
NASA Studies Details of a Greening Arctic (June 2016)
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Published on Jun 2, 2016

NASA scientists used almost 30 years of data from the NASA/U.S. Geological Survey Landsat satellites to track changes in vegetation in Alaska and Canada. Of the more than 4 million square miles, 30 percent had increases in vegetation (greening) while only 3 percent had decreases (browning).


This is the first study to produce a continent-scale map while still providing detailed information at the human scale. "It shows the climate impact on vegetation in the high latitudes," said Jeffrey Masek, a researcher who worked on the study and the Landsat 9 project scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The study, led by NASA scientist Junchang Ju, is online here


Temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than elsewhere, which has led to longer seasons for plants to grow in and changes to the soils. Scientists have observed grassy tundras changing to shrublands, and shrubs growing bigger and denser – changes that could have impacts on regional water, energy, and carbon cycles. With the large, continental-scale map complete, researchers will focus on the more human scale – looking at local conditions to see what might control the greening patterns, whether it's local topography, nearby water sources, or particular types of habitat. They also plan to investigate forested areas, particularly in the greening Quebec.

More information.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Matthew Radcliff
Music: "Alaska," by Janik Riegert [GEMA], Josh Tapen [GEMA]

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio here. at:

If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel here.  
EarthSayers Matthew Radcliff; Josh Tapen
Date unknown Format Visualization
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Global Warming Teaching Circle More Details
Climate Change by Terisa Siagatonu
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Published on May 23, 2016

Spoken word artist Terisa Siagatonu shares her poem on climate change and talking about climate change and climate justice.
Terisa Tinei Siagatonu is a spoken word artist/arts educator and community organizer from the Bay Area. A graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz, she is currently the Project Director for PIER: the Pacific Islander Education and Retention project at UCLA, an access project that exists to combat the low matriculation rates of Pacific Islander students into higher education by offering services ranging from free tutoring, mentorship, and peer advising to Pacific Islander high school students in Los Angeles. Her emergence into the spoken word world as a queer Samoan women and activist has granted her the opportunities to perform on stages ranging from Boston’s Cutler Majestic Theatre to the Women’s Stage at the 2010 Oakland PRIDE Festival. She has worked as a poet mentor with Youth Speaks, the leading nonprofit organization for spoken word performance and literary arts education in the country, as well as on grassroots levels with groups such as One Love Oceania, a queer Pacific Islander women’s organization from the Bay Area, the Samoan Community Development Center of San Francisco, Empowering Pacific Islander Communities of Los Angeles, and Engaging Education of the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her devotion to her Pacific Islander people and her work with college access and spoken word poetry helps her to drive the development of Pacific Islander youth, advocating for self-empowerment so they can create sustainable impact in their communities, starting with themselves.
EarthSayer Terisa Siagatonu
Date unknown Format Performance
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Justice More Details
Climate Change, Now, in the Philippines by Isabella Borgeson
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Published on May 19, 2016Spoken word artist Isabella Borgeson shares her piece on Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda), one of the strongest storms that hit the Philippines on November 8, 2013. Follow her on Twitter.
EarthSayer Isabella Borgeson
Date unknown Format Performance
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Justice More Details
On Climate Risk and Scenario Planning by Dr. Mark Trexler
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This video covers Scenario Planning in more detail. Dr. Trexler also discusses the size of businesses (large and smaller) that will find the tools of climate risk very helpful. He also briefly covers the two sided coin of risk and opportunity. Mark has more than 30 years of regulatory and energy policy experience, and has advised clients around the world on climate change risk and risk management for more than 25 years. He and his business partner, attorney Laura H. Kosloff have created The Climate Web, a tool for finding “actionable climate knowledge.” It’s critically needed in the face of today’s overwhelming levels of raw information relevant to climate change and climate risk.

Mark Trexler was interviewed by Ruth Ann Barrett of EarthSayers.tv, Voices of Sustainability and videotaped by cameraman, Barry Heidt in the EcoTrust Building in Portland, Oregon on April 23, 2016. Published on Apr 29, 2016

EarthSayer Mark Trexler
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Intro to the Climate Web by Mark Trexler
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Interview with climate change expert, Dr. Mark Trexler on April 23, 2016. Mark and his business partner, Laura Kosloff created The Climate Web™, a knowledge solution to help users find the information they need to identify and track the climate risk issues of most importance to them. The Climate Web organizes thousands of reports, news stories, blogs, and other materials, often extracting and linking critical information for easy access. He was interviewed by Ruth Ann Barrett of EarthSayers.tv, Voices of Sustainability. Camera work by Barry Heidt. Published on Apr 27, 2016

EarthSayer Mark Trexler
Date unknown Format Product
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
 

Displaying 10 videos of 240 matching videos

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