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Sustainability at the 34th America's Cup Finals by Jill Savery
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An interview with Jill Savery the Head of Sustainability for the America's Cup Event Authority at the 34th America's Cup at the finals held in San Francisco, September 2013. Ms. Savery talks about how sustainability was embedded into all the roles at this major sporting event from power and fuel to public transportation and partnering with organizations such as Sailors For the Sea, the official Clean Regattas partner, and with Offsetters, the Official Carbon Credit Supplier and their Great Bear Forest Carbon Project.

Sailors for the Sea, the only ocean conservation nonprofit focused on the sailing and boating community, is proud to announce that the 34th America's Cup earned a Sailors for the Sea Platinum Level Clean Regattas certification, the highest level possible.
Interviewed by Ruth Ann Barrett of EarthSayers.tv with the support of David and Mary Kay Okimoto.



EarthSayer Jill Savery
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords Sustainability More Details
NASA | Ask a Climate Scientist Submit Your Question
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Published on Sep 4, 2013

Have a question that's always confounded you about Earth's climate? Wonder why it matters that the climate is changing now if it has changed before? Or how scientists know changes seen in recent decades are the result of human activities, not natural causes?

Go ahead. Ask a climate scientist.


To submit a question, record a short, 10-15 second video with your question and upload it to YouTube -- and be sure to tag the video "#askclimate" so that we can find it. You can also simply post a question on Twitter with the same hashtag, "#askclimate."
NASA scientists will be recording video responses to some of the questions we receive. The responses will be posted to the NASAExplorer YouTube channel.


EarthSayer Charlie Bolden
Date unknown Format Series
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
NASA | Ask a Climate Scientist: Food Production by Molly Brown
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Will climate change drastically reduce our food production, or will it change what we produce?

This question from Twitter was posed to Goddard Space Flight Center's Molly Brown as part of NASA's Ask A Climate Scientist campaign, #askclimate

For more about the connection between climate variability and food production, go here: http://www.nasa.gov/content/goddard/c...

EarthSayer Molly Brown
Date unknown Format Series
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
NASA | Ask a Climate Scientist: CO2 and Temperature by Dr. Hildebrand
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Is there any merit to the studies that show that historical CO2 levels lag behind temperature, and not lead them?
Yes, there's merit to those studies, says Peter Hildebrand, Director of the Earth Science Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, responding to a question from Twitter (https://twitter.com/Seth_b_clark/stat...).

In the pre-industrial age, the CO2 response to temperature was that the temperature would go up and CO2 would go up. Or if the temperature went down, CO2 would go down. Because when the temperature rose, the whole biosphere revved up and emitted CO2. So we understand that process.

In the post-industrial age, the opposite is true. Increasing CO2 in the atmosphere is leading to increased temperature. So two different things happened, one pre-industrial, where temperature was driving the CO2, and post-industrial, where CO2 was driving temperature. Which means a completely different physical-biological process is going on.Published on Sep 24, 2013



For more about Ask A Climate Scientist, go here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49Lu1d...

EarthSayer Peter Hildebrand
Date unknown Format Series
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
NASA | Ask a Climate Scientist: Global Warming Pause? Josh Willis
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Is there a pause in global warming?

This question was posed to Jet Propulsion Laboratory scientist Josh Willis as part of NASA's Ask A Climate Scientist campaign.

Josh gets asked a lot if there has been a pause in global warming, because temperatures aren't increasing as fast as they were a decade ago. No, he says, global warming is definitely still increasing (http://climate.nasa.gov/key_indicator...). We see more heat being trapped in the oceans, and sea levels are rising. Look at the sea level record for the last decade (http://climate.nasa.gov/key_indicator...). It's going up like gangbusters, hasn't slowed down.

There's not really a pause in global warming. Sometimes there's natural fluctuations and we warm up a little faster in one decade and a little slower in another decade, but global warming, human-caused climate change? Josh says, "that's definitely going right on up in there. We haven't slowed down at all."

See more of NASA's answers to your questions on climate science (http://bit.ly/1b7rSdL).

 

EarthSayer Josh Willis
Date unknown Format Series
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Why Single-Degree Climate Changes Matter by Anthony Leiserowitz
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In a preview of this week's Moyers & Company, climate communication expert Anthony Leiserowitz explains that single-digit degree changes in our climate are comparable to single-digit degree changes in our body temperature when we get sick. "I think there's an analogy here — that little difference in global average temperature, just like that little difference in body temperature, can have huge implications as you keep going," Leiserowitz tells Bill.

Visit Climate Change collection at billmoyers.com.

EarthSayers Anthony Leiserowitz; Bill Moyers
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Arctic Sea Ice Update by Dr. Tom Wagner of NASA
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An interview with NASA cryospheric scientist Dr. Tom Wagner, on the state of this summer's Arctic sea ice. More information from NASA on ice is here. Published on Aug 23, 2013

EarthSayer Tom Wagner
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Climate Change Summit by State of Maryland
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The Governor, Martin O'Malley talks about State's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Plan and reducing emissions by 2020 and emphasized the need for collaboration between public and private sector.

EarthSayer Governor Martin O'Malley
Date unknown Format News
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Projected U.S. Temperature Changes by 2100 from NASA
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Published on Jul 23, 2013

The average temperature across the continental U.S. could be 8 degrees Fahrenheit warmer by the end of the 21st century under a climate scenario in which concentrations of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide rise to 800 parts per million. Current concentrations stand at 400 parts per million, and are rising faster than at any time in Earth's history.

"These visualizations communicate a picture of the impacts of climate change in a way that words do not," says Allison Leidner, Ph.D., a scientist who coordinates NASA's involvement in the National Climate Assessment "When I look at the scenarios for future temperature and precipitation, I really see how dramatically our nation's climate could change."

These visualizations -- which highlight computer model projections from the draft National Climate Assessment -- show how average temperatures could change across the U.S. in the coming decades under two different carbon dioxide emissions scenarios.



EarthSayer Allison Leidner
Date unknown Format Visualization
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Projected U.S. Precipitation Changes by 2100 from NASA
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Published on Jul 23, 2013

The climate of the southwestern U.S. could be a lot drier by 2100. The climate of the northeastern U.S. could be a lot wetter.


"These visualizations communicate a picture of the impacts of climate change in a way that words do not," says Allison Leidner, Ph.D., a scientist who coordinates NASA's involvement in the National Climate Assessment "When I look at the scenarios for future temperature and precipitation, I really see how dramatically our nation's climate could change."

New visualizations of computer model projections show how precipitation patterns could change across the U.S. in the coming decades under two different carbon dioxide emissions scenarios.

The date seen in the bottom-right corner is the mid-point of the 30-year average being shown. To learn more about the National Climate Assessment, due out in 2014, visit here.

EarthSayer Allison Leidner
Date unknown Format Visualization
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
 

Displaying 10 videos of 291 matching videos

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