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Amazon Watch, your best bet to protect the rainforest.
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Since its beginning 20 years ago, Amazon Watch has been deeply committed to defending indigenous peoples' rights and territories, for they are the best guardians of their rainforest homes. Considering that indigenous lands hold 80% of global biodiversity, it is no surprise that extractive industries want their resources. If left to them, the Amazon's Sacred Headwaters would become one big oil field, and the watersheds of the Brazilian Amazon would be destroyed by agribusiness and mega-dams. There is another way! Amazon Watch continues to stand with indigenous allies in defending their territories and sacred natural areas as industrial "No Go Zones." We are committed to supporting and amplifying Sarayaku's Kawsak Sacha, or Living Forests, proposal in defense of all life in the Amazon by keeping the oil in the ground. We want to expand this model throughout the Amazon, so that places like Yasuní National Park and the Xingu and Tapajós rivers will never again be considered for industrial development. We are also waging international market campaigns to expose and pressure governments and corporations that are causing harm. Our new Amazon Crude Campaign aims to reduce demand for rainforest-destroying oil. We recently began working with Brazilian allies to expose the financiers of environmental and indigenous rights law rollbacks. Learn more and join the movement at amazonwatch.org. Produced by @Ecodeo (http://www.ecodeo.co) Additional footage generously provided by: Todd Southgate, SpectralQ, Gert-Peter Bruch / Planète Amazone.

Date 5/8/2017 Format Appeal
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Forests More Details
Sarayaku in Standing Rock
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From the Ecuadorian Amazon, Sarayaku stands in solidarity with the Sioux Nation in North Dakota in their peaceful struggle against the oil pipeline crossing their sacred land in Standing Rock. #NoDAPL

EarthSayer Franco Tulio Viteri Gualanga
Date 2/27/2017 Format Appeal
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
Sarayaku in Standing Rock
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Published on Feb 27, 2017

From the Ecuadorian Amazon,

stands in solidarity with the Sioux Nation in North Dakota in their peaceful struggle against the oil pipeline crossing their sacred land in Standing Rock. #NoDAPL

Date 2/27/2017 Format Demonstrations
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
Twenty Years of Defending the Amazon.
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October 26, 2016 Since its beginning 20 years ago, Amazon Watch has been deeply committed to defending indigenous peoples' rights and territories, for they are the best guardians of their rainforest homes. Considering that indigenous lands hold 80% of global biodiversity, it is no surprise that extractive industries want their resources. If left to them, the Amazon's Sacred Headwaters would become one big oil field, and the watersheds of the Brazilian Amazon would be destroyed by agribusiness and mega-dams. There is another way! Amazon Watch continues to stand with indigenous allies in defending their territories and sacred natural areas as industrial "No Go Zones." We are committed to supporting and amplifying Sarayaku's Kawsak Sacha, or Living Forests, proposal in defense of all life in the Amazon by keeping the oil in the ground. We want to expand this model throughout the Amazon, so that places like Yasuní National Park and the Xingu and Tapajós rivers will never again be considered for industrial development. We are also waging international market campaigns to expose and pressure governments and corporations that are causing harm. Our new Amazon Crude Campaign aims to reduce demand for rainforest-destroying oil. We recently began working with Brazilian allies to expose the financiers of environmental and indigenous rights law rollbacks. Learn more and join the movement at amazonwatch.org. Produced by @Ecodeo (http://www.ecodeo.co) Additional footage generously provided by: Todd Southgate, SpectralQ, Gert-Peter Bruch / Planète Amazone.

Date 10/24/2016 Format Instructional
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Forests More Details
We Have to Keep Fighting: Standing Rock
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Water Protectors Vow Continued Resistance to DAPL as Main Camp Is Evicted

Reported on by Amy Goodman of Democracy Now.

Published on Feb 23, 2017

In North Dakota, the main resistance camp set up by Lakota water protectors fighting the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline has been largely vacated after protesters were ordered to leave the camp on Wednesday. Police arrested around 10 people. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the North Dakota governor had imposed a noon eviction deadline for the hundreds of water protectors still living at the resistance camp. Prayers ceremonies were held on Wednesday, and part of the camp was set on fire before the eviction began. Water protectors say the resistance camp sits on unceded Sioux territory under the 1851 Treaty of Fort Laramie and that they have a right to remain on their ancestral land. A couple dozen people remain at the camp. The ongoing encampments in North Dakota were the largest gathering of Native Americans in decades. At its peak, more than 10,000 people were at the resistance camp. Earlier this month, construction crews resumed work on the final section of the pipeline, after the Trump administration granted an easement to allow Energy Transfer Partners to drill beneath the Missouri River. We go to Standing Rock to speak with LaDonna Brave Bull Allard and Linda Black Elk.
EarthSayers Linda Black Elk; LaDonna Brave Bull Allard
Date unknown Format News
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
A Standing Rock Camp Is Burned | The Daily 360 | The New York Times
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Published on Feb 23, 2017
A Standing Rock Camp Is Burned | The Daily 360 | The New York Times

The largest protest camp at Standing Rock was cleared on Wednesday (2/22) after the governor of North Dakota ordered the evacuation of people who had occupied the land for months.

By: Nick Cote, Niko Koppel, and Kaitlyn Mullin

Read the story here

Date unknown Format News
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
Veterans for Standing Rock with Michael A Wood Jr.
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Published on Dec 1, 2016

Malcolm Fleschner of TYT Network interviews Michael A. Wood Jr., a former Marine and Baltimore Police Officer who became a whistleblower over police violence and Veterans for Standing Rock PR coordinator Ashleigh Jennifer Parker. Michael co-founded the Veterans for Standing Rock effort to bring veterans to North Dakota to support the water protectors there. 

EarthSayer Michael A. Wood
Date unknown Format Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
One Man's Fears for Standing Rock by Richard White
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Published on Nov 22, 2016

Richard White, a life-long resident of Standing Rock, discusses his relationship to the land and the water, and his fear for their future.

By: KC McGinnis, Kaitlyn Mullin, and Maureen Towey
EarthSayer Richard White
Date unknown Format Documentary
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
Standing Rock Celebrates Halted Pipeline Dec 5, 2016
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Published on Dec 5, 2016

Stand in a drum circle at the Oceti Sakowin camp just after the Army announced on Sunday that it would explore alternative routes for the Dakota Access pipeline.

By: Benjamin Norman, Niko Koppel and Kaitlyn Mullin
Date unknown Format News
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
Standing Rock: A Point of Unity and Connectedness by Grace Eagle Reed
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Published on Nov 28, 2016

As part of a post election InterFaith Call to Inclusion, Grace Eagle Reed was interviewed on her view of Standing Rock and the #noDAPL movement. Grace was born into Tsa La Gi culture and was adopted by Lakota Grace Spotted Eagle and taught traditional ways. Produced and videotaped by Ruth Ann Barrett and Barry Heidt of EarthSayers.tv, Voices of Sustainability, November 16, 2016.
EarthSayer Grace Eagle Reed
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Standing Rock Indian Reservation More Details
 

Displaying 10 videos of 67 matching videos

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