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NASA Studies Details of a Greening Arctic (June 2016)
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Published on Jun 2, 2016

NASA scientists used almost 30 years of data from the NASA/U.S. Geological Survey Landsat satellites to track changes in vegetation in Alaska and Canada. Of the more than 4 million square miles, 30 percent had increases in vegetation (greening) while only 3 percent had decreases (browning).

This is the first study to produce a continent-scale map while still providing detailed information at the human scale. "It shows the climate impact on vegetation in the high latitudes," said Jeffrey Masek, a researcher who worked on the study and the Landsat 9 project scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. The study, led by NASA scientist Junchang Ju, is online here

Temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than elsewhere, which has led to longer seasons for plants to grow in and changes to the soils. Scientists have observed grassy tundras changing to shrublands, and shrubs growing bigger and denser – changes that could have impacts on regional water, energy, and carbon cycles. With the large, continental-scale map complete, researchers will focus on the more human scale – looking at local conditions to see what might control the greening patterns, whether it's local topography, nearby water sources, or particular types of habitat. They also plan to investigate forested areas, particularly in the greening Quebec.

More information.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Matthew Radcliff
Music: "Alaska," by Janik Riegert [GEMA], Josh Tapen [GEMA]

This video is public domain and along with other supporting visualizations can be downloaded from the Scientific Visualization Studio here. at:

If you liked this video, subscribe to the NASA Goddard YouTube channel here.  
EarthSayers Matthew Radcliff; Josh Tapen
Date unknown Format Visualization
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Climate Change by Terisa Siagatonu
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Published on May 23, 2016

Spoken word artist Terisa Siagatonu shares her poem on climate change and talking about climate change and climate justice.
Terisa Tinei Siagatonu is a spoken word artist/arts educator and community organizer from the Bay Area. A graduate of the University of California, Santa Cruz, she is currently the Project Director for PIER: the Pacific Islander Education and Retention project at UCLA, an access project that exists to combat the low matriculation rates of Pacific Islander students into higher education by offering services ranging from free tutoring, mentorship, and peer advising to Pacific Islander high school students in Los Angeles. Her emergence into the spoken word world as a queer Samoan women and activist has granted her the opportunities to perform on stages ranging from Boston’s Cutler Majestic Theatre to the Women’s Stage at the 2010 Oakland PRIDE Festival. She has worked as a poet mentor with Youth Speaks, the leading nonprofit organization for spoken word performance and literary arts education in the country, as well as on grassroots levels with groups such as One Love Oceania, a queer Pacific Islander women’s organization from the Bay Area, the Samoan Community Development Center of San Francisco, Empowering Pacific Islander Communities of Los Angeles, and Engaging Education of the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her devotion to her Pacific Islander people and her work with college access and spoken word poetry helps her to drive the development of Pacific Islander youth, advocating for self-empowerment so they can create sustainable impact in their communities, starting with themselves.
EarthSayer Terisa Siagatonu
Date unknown Format Performance
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Justice More Details
Climate Change, Now, in the Philippines by Isabella Borgeson
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Published on May 19, 2016Spoken word artist Isabella Borgeson shares her piece on Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda), one of the strongest storms that hit the Philippines on November 8, 2013. Follow her on Twitter.
EarthSayer Isabella Borgeson
Date unknown Format Performance
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Justice More Details
The Crossing: Erick's Story (Philippines)
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As the Greenpeace ship Esperanza is trailing Shell's drilling ship the Polar Pioneer across the Pacific, the bosun Erick reflects on how climate change is wreaking havoc on the Philippines, his home country. Published on Apr 2, 2015 Visit Save the Arctic, Greenpeace. 

Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
A Week in the Life of Rain from NASA
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Rain, snow, hail, ice, and every slushy mix in between make up the precipitation that touches everyone on our planet. But not all places rain equally. Precipitation falls differently in different parts of the world, as you see in NASA's new video that captures every shower, every snow storm and every hurricane from August 4 to August 14, 2014. The GPM Core Observatory, co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), was launched on Feb 27, 2014, and provides advanced instruments that can see rain and falling snow all the way through the atmosphere. More information.

Date unknown Format Instructional
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Climate Change More Details
Rebuilding Resilient Communities by Secretary Julián Castro
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U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Julián Castro talks about how HUD helps rebuild communities after natural disasters. After Hurricane Sandy, HUD shifted from just helping communities rebuild the way they were before, to showing communities how to rebuild to be resilient for the future. "Our hope is that through the investments that we're making now and the example that these communities that are participating in Rebuild By Design in the National Disaster Resilience Competition the example that they're setting will set best practices that are then adopted by states throughout our country," said Secretary Castro. Published on Mar 16, 2015

EarthSayer Julián Castro
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Resiliency and Communities More Details
How to Build Better, More Resilient Cities with Judith Rodin
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Judith Rodin advises:  preparing for the future means building better cities. New York; Athens; Wenzhou; Boston; Oslo; Dhaka; New Orleans; Nairobi. In recent years, dozens of cities across the globe have beenhit by large-scale catastrophes of every kind: natural disaster, geopolitical conflict, food shortages, disease and contagion, terrorist attacks. If you haven't been directly touched by one of these cataclysms yourself, in our interconnected world you are sure to have been affected in some way. They harm vulnerable individuals, destabilise communities and threaten organisations and even whole societies.


We are at greater risk than ever from city-wide catastrophe, and as the severity and frequency of these disasters increase, we must become better at preparing for, responding to and recovering from them. Why did more girls than boys drown in Japan's 2011 tsunami, and what does the case of Haiti's humanitarian aid tell us about the future?



Dr Judith Rodin, President, Rockefeller Foundation, author of The Resilience Dividend, and one of the world's leading public thinkers, brings together ground-breaking research to help build a radical future in which individuals, companies and entire societies avert disaster by creating more dynamic, more resilient cities. To order her book from Amazon, just click on the image or visit your local book store. Streamed live on Jan 20, 2015


EarthSayer Judith Rodin
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Investing and Sustainability More Details
AECOM Recovering from Sandy (Part 2 of 3)
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Learn how Superstorm Sandy impacted the Long Island Regional Sustainability Plan. Fran Reid, Chief Sustainability Officer Town of Hempstead and John Kaiman talk about their experiences after Superstorm Sandy hit the many communities on Long Island. Part 1 and Part 3. Published on Apr 28, 2014

EarthSayer Fran Reid
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Architecture and Green Building More Details
Sustainability, Climate Change and the Plan (part 3 of 3)
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See how the Long Island Regional Sustainability Plan may help with planning across the region and throughout the East Coast of the United States. Published on Apr 28, 2014  Featured in the interviews is Diane Dale of AECOM and project Director and Gary Lawrence, AECOM Chief Sustainability Officer who addresses mitigation, resilency, and adaptation in relation to the recovery from Sandy.
EarthSayer Gary Lawrence
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Architecture and Green Building More Details
Planning for a Cleaner, Greener, Long Island (Part 1 of 3)
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Find out how AECOM is helping communities on Long Island, New York, United States, develop a sustainable plan for the future.  Rosemary Olsen former director Green Initiatives, the Community Development Corporation talks about the consortium of towns they brought together. John Kaiman, special advisor to NYS Governor for Sandy Recovery and former Supervisor Town of North Hempstead and Diane Dale, AECOM Project Director talk about the public private partnership and the AECOM role in the project.  Part 2 and Part 3. 

EarthSayers Diane Dale; John Kaiman; Rosemary Olsen
Date unknown Format Interview
Length unknown Keywords SustainabilityMember of Special Collection Architecture and Green Building More Details
 

Displaying 10 videos of 23 matching videos

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